How schizophrenia begins

I’ve heard lots of stories. Sometimes what is later diagnosed as schizophrenia presents itself as a dramatic physical complaint that is dismissed by the family doctor or in the emergency room. Severe heart palpitations, perhaps, or the feeling that your legs won’t support you as you suddenly collapse on the athletic field.

For Chris, the dramatic scene was on a plane that was about to land. I was seated next to him when I was suddenly jolted out of my reading by a scream. I turned to see his hand shooting to his temple. The plane landed and the pain disappeared as suddenly as it had started.

“Nothing to worry about,” the doctor assured him. A follow-up visit revealed no new information.

Over the next few months Chris kept tapping a certain spot on his temple, saying it felt like an indentation. Chris went back to the doctor and received the same answer. There was nothing to worry about.

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17 thoughts on “How schizophrenia begins”

  1. My grandson, Skylar, kept having severe headaches. He went to the ER, some stupid doctor told him he might have a brain tumor. Didn’t run any tests.

  2. My son went to Macedonia for a week during spring break. He woke up one night with a seer headache, he felt like his brain was exploding. It didn’t last but from then on his life was on very different trajectory.

  3. My son went to Macedonia for a week during spring break. He woke up one night with a headache, he felt like his brain was exploding. It didn’t last but from then on his life was on very different trajectory.

  4. I just had an “aha” moment. For a long time I wondered how Andrew was an adult in public but a child at home. It almost seems as if he is afraid to grow up and assume the responsibilities that come with being an adult;
    getting an apartment, a job, a relationship with someone other than mum. He has often stated that his family is messed up, my response is show me a family that isn’t. This is his split personality -child/adult. His “headache” happened when he was about eighteen, which ties in with the age at which growing up is beginning. He is stuck, now how do we get help as a family to help him “grow up”. New challenge, find a family therapist to assist.

    1. Dear Rosa,
      I have a question for you: How you survive all this and how you stay normal?
      I am in exactly at same position like Elizabeth (her words are like my) and it is very painful.
      Regrets!

      Down

  5. A few days ago I corresponded with a psychiatrist who is investigating the link between autoimmune issues and schizophrenia. Here is her response to the headache concern:
    “Yes, this is seen in autoimmune conditions – viral symptoms or headache a few days or weeks beforehand.”

  6. How to find help when my son (22 years old) do not like to go anywhere for talk.
    I am against modern medicine and her way of treating medical disorders.
    For 5 years (how he is in such condition) we have tray homeopathy and Bach flower drops. It helps to calm him for couple weeks and his terrible anxiety and anger start again.
    My family is not family anymore. We are broken.
    How to push him to go and ask for psychotherapy or to talk with someone?
    He just accusing us for his condition.

    1. Dear Down,
      I strongly recommend that your son takes a look at music therapy, the kind that Laurna Tallman advocates on her blog.
      MentalHealththroughMusic.ca
      https://northernlightbooks.ca/MentalHealththroughMusic/?page_id=122
      I have noticed that my son is much calmer and he is very focused on the art work that goes along with this. Please also see my previous blog post on Laurna Tallman’s work.
      https://rossaforbes.com/how-to-cure-schizophrenia/

  7. Dear Rosa,

    My son is 18 and his symptoms started about a year and a half ago. He, too, suffered from headaches.

    I am currently trying to find “alternative” doctors and alternative treatments as he refuses to go back to the psychiatrist or his other therapists. Now 18, I can’t force him.

    Music therapy like mentioned above!

    I am terrified he is going to hurt himself and not sure where to turn. I am planning to buy your book but am also wondering if you have advice on where to start to get the help we need.

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