Ketogenic diet and schizophrenia

The case for the link between inflammation and schizophrenia is getting stronger.

From Psychiatry Advisor

A specialized weight loss diet preferred by some bodybuilders may be effective in treating schizophrenia, according to research published in Schizophrenia Research

Although further studies using other animal models are needed to confirm these findings, the authors wrote that “as [a ketogenic diet] has been safely and effectively administered to humans in different pathological conditions, [this treatment] has the potential to be swiftly translated into a novel, safe and effective management of schizophrenia.”

Reference

Kraeuter AK, Loxton H, Lima BC, Rudd D, Sarnyai Z. Ketogenic diet reverses behavioral abnormalities in an acute NMDA receptor hypofunction model of schizophreniaSchizophr Res. 2015; doi:10.1016/j.schres.2015.10.041.

A case report From US National Library of Medicine  National Institutes of Mental Health website

Nutr Metab (Lond). 2009; 6: 10.
Published online 2009 Feb 26. doi:  10.1186/1743-7075-6-10
PMCID: PMC2652467

Schizophrenia, gluten, and low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets: a case report and review of the literature

Abstract

We report the unexpected resolution of longstanding schizophrenic symptoms after starting a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet. After a review of the literature, possible reasons for this include the metabolic consequences from the elimination of gluten from the diet, and the modulation of the disease of schizophrenia at the cellular level.

Case report

C.D. is a 70 year-old Caucasian female with a diagnosis of schizophrenia since the age of seventeen. Her diagnosis was based on paranoia, disorganized speech, and hallucinations. She reported both auditory and visual hallucinations, including seeing skeletons and hearing voices that told her to hurt herself. According to her history, she has had these hallucinations on almost a daily basis since the age of seven. C.D. has also been hospitalized at least five times over the last six years for suicide attempts and increased psychotic symptoms. She has attempted to overdose on medications, cut herself, and ingest cleaning agents. Her most recenthospitalization was five months prior to initiating the low-carbohydrate diet. She has discussed both her suicidal ideations and her hallucinations with her psychiatrist who has tried to optimize her medication regimen in an effort to improve her symptoms, but this has been largely unsuccessful. Her prior anti-psychotic and mood-stabilizing medication regimen has included lithium 900 mg qhs, olanzapine (dose unknown), ziprasidone 40 mg bid, aripiprazole 30 mg qhs, lamotrigine 100 mg bid, and quetiapine 900 mg qhs. She is currently managed on risperidone 4 mg qhs.

Continue reading “Ketogenic diet and schizophrenia”

Writing my way through The Scenic Route

Forgive me the continuous play on words that are scattered in this post. In August, I came to the end of the road on my ten year writing journey to document the healing journey that my son and I embarked upon. The Scenic Route will be published in January. Why did it take so long you may well ask? For one, I’m not a writer. I became a writer over the course of the journey, partly as a way of holding on to my own sanity by having a Purpose in life. Finding a purpose in life is one of the many side roads that Chris and I ventured off on, me doing the driving and he mainly along for the ride, at least for a good part of these years. I felt sure that if he found a Purpose in life, too, perhaps he would eventually take over the steering wheel.

Chapter 46 opens when Chris is 27, which is 7 years after his first psychotic breakdown, and after multiple therapies have been tried. Continue reading “Writing my way through The Scenic Route”